Pomegranate fruit Farming: Find Out About Diseases in Pomegranate

Pomegranate Fruit

The Pomegranate (Locally known as kukumanga) originated from the Mediterranean. It prefers tropical to sub-tropical and temperate zones. Oxfarm Organic Ltd informs you about these problems so that you can plan well and have the best outcome.

This is a fruit known for all the misconceptions but it is fetching people a lot of money. Pomegranate fruit life diseases are a standard issue in plants grown in wet regions throughout the spring and early summer. Different diseases in pomegranate fruit are rarer and not good in damaging the tree. Learn the issues of pomegranates and see if this fruit is true for you and your region.

Problems of Pomegranates

pomegranate fruitPomegranates are vigorous trees or shrubs that adapt well to regions that support citrus plants. There are varieties suited to semi-temperate zones however these want well-drained soil and protection from excess wetness. Though the plant likes supplemental irrigation in summer for best fruit formation, too wet soils and humidness will cause a spread of pomegranate fruit diseases. There are several strategies of treating pomegranate fruit diseases, thus don’t despair and keep reading for a few solutions. Pomegranate fruit life problems are a part of growing pomegranate plants. Pomegranate fruit perform best in areas with hot, dry summers, which implies northern gardeners in cooler regions with plentiful precipitation could notice raising the tree a challenge. The foremost frequent criticism is Pomegranate diseases that affects the fruit. Several plant life problems can cause some leaf drop; however, this can be typically not enough to influence overall tree health. The pomegranate fruit is the main reason for growing the plant and there are several diseases that may cause cacophonic, rot and an overall look and style that are unappealing. Begin with correct web site location and well drained, organically amended soil. Plant the trees fifteen to twenty feet apart to forestall overcrowding and enhance circulation. Fertilize once growth begins with ammonium ion salt divided into four applications beginning in Feb and ending in September.

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Specific Pomegranate Plant Life Diseases

Pomegranate fruitAs the most concerning diseases in pomegranate, plant life problems are the toughest to regulate. The frequent agitators are Alternaria fruit rot, genus Aspergillus fruit rot and Boytrytis. 

Alternaria fruit rot – Alternaria is additionally referred to as plant disease and causes injury to the fruit within the sort of wounds and decay on the inside of the fruit. It happens once serious rains simply once fruit is getting down to type.

Aspergillus fruit rot – Aspergillus fungus has similar temporal arrangement and effects as Alternaria plant life problems.

Botrytris – Botrytis, a grey mould that is acquainted to any sodbuster of tropical fruits, infects trees throughout flowering. Spores infiltrate the flowers and keep in hibernation throughout mature. It’s activated throughout the post-harvest wash and spreads like wild hearth through all the harvested fruits.

Another occasional plant life issue is Cercospora fruit spot, which cannot solely cause black unsound spots on the surface of fruit however additionally compressed black areas on twigs and defoliation. It will really cause a tree to die over time.

Treating Pomegranate Fruit Diseases

Control of plant life problems ought to begin before the fruit develops in early spring and continue through summer as fruits mature. Use a copper anti-fungal fungicide according with the directions and promote smart circulation by pruning within the dormant season to open the cover. Several of the precise causes of those diseases don’t seem to be fully understood however anti-fungal agent use and correct cultivation of the plants will facilitate the tree combat minor infestations. Smart healthy trees are less probably to be fazed by minor plant life problems. Within the case of Cercospora, removal of morbid leaves, twigs and fruits will facilitate management its unfold, together with anti-fungal application.

 

For additional information regarding pomegranate fruits, kindly visit our offices.

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TANGERINES SEEDLINGS

<span data-recalc-dims=TANGERINES SEEDLINGS" > Tangerines grow well in areas that don’t have harsh winters and will produce an abundance of flavorful fruit every year with just a little bit of help. The fruit often ripens in the winter or early spring, making tangerines a popular winter snack and a traditional Christmas favorite in many homes. While a single tree can produce fruit on its own, planting more than one tangerine cultivar in an area can increase the yield of tangerines on all the trees.
Tangerines are relatively cold-tolerant, making them easier to grow than oranges, grapefruits and other types of citrus. Some varieties, such as the Citrus reticulata "Dancy," are heat-tolerant and do best when summers are hot, but other types, including the Citrus reticulata "Sunburst," do best when summers are on the cool side.
Citrus species can thrive in a wide range of soil and climatic conditions. Citrus is grown from sea level up to an altitude of 2100 m but for optimal growth a temperature range from 2° to 30° C is ideal. Long periods below 0°C are injurious to the trees and at -13° C growth diminishes. However, individual species and varieties decrease in susceptibility to low temperatures in the following sequence: grapefruit, sweet orange, mandarin, lemon/lime and trifoliate orange as most hardy.
Temperature plays an important role in the production of high quality fruit. Typical coloring of fruit takes place if night temperatures are about 14° C coupled with low humidity during ripening time. Exposure to strong winds and temperatures above 38° C may cause fruit drop, scarring and scorching of fruits. In the tropics, the high lands provide the best night weather for orange color and flavor.

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MACADAMIA SEEDLINGS

<span data-recalc-dims=MACADAMIA SEEDLINGS" > Macadamia is a beautiful tree, very forgiving; resilient to all weather, accommodative for old
people; they don’t need to work so hard nor climb to pick the nuts but wait for them to fall. The macadamia nut tree is indigenous to Australia but introduced in Kenya in 1945 to 1948. In Kenya, it grows roughly in the same climate suitable for growing coffee.
The grafted seedling takes 3-4 months to be ready for planting out in the farm. Seedlings are planting out in the field at a spacing of 9m x 9m or 10 m x 10 m or more if the trees are
intercropped with coffee or any other crop e.g. maize; however, if they are being planted as pure orchard, the spacing should be 4m x 10 m or 5 m x 10 m.
Kenya is sitting on a gold mine that if properly utilized would reap huge benefits for the country.
For many years, tea and coffee farming has been the major source of income for thousands of
farmers, however they are now changing tides and switching to macadamia nut farming.
Macadamia has become a lucrative produce all over sudden with a kilo of the nuts selling for
more than a hundred and a grafted seedling price shooting up from 300 to 500 Kenya Shillings.
Between1986 to 2002 the price ranged between 7 to 23 Shillings per kg., and in 2005 it averaged
80 Shillings per Kg.
The Kenya macadamia nut industry is currently made of approximately 900,000 trees of varying ages from one year to 20 years, grown by over 100,000 small scale farmers with an average of 6 -12 trees per grower. Annual production is about 4,000 metric tons of nuts-in-shell. These produce about 800 metric tons of marketable kernels, making the main commercial product. Other by products such as oil, are minimal. Producers get from nuts-in-shell Shillings 92 million per year.
Kenya is the third largest macadamia producer and the second largest exporter of macadamias. Many Kenyan farmers are integrating macadamia trees into their coffee and tea plantations. They view macadamia output as insurance against the uncertainties of weather which affect coffee and tea.

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GRAFTED PURPLE PASSION SEEDLINGS

<span data-recalc-dims=GRAFTED PURPLE PASSION SEEDLINGS" > Passion fruit is a climbing plant of the Passifloraceae family. It is the size of an egg and is yellow or purple. Purple passion fruit (Passiflora edulis) is subtropical, important in some countries, while the more tropical yellow passion fruit excels in others. Both yield delicious juice. The passion fruit vine is a shallow-rooted, woody, perennial, and climbing by means of tendrils. The alternate, evergreen leaves, deeply 3-lobed when mature, are finely toothed, 3 to 8 in (7.5-20 cm) long, deep green and glossy above, paler and dull beneath, and the fruit is purple in color when mature. Commercial farming of purple passion fruit begun in Kenya in 1933 and was expanded in 1960, when the crop was also introduced into Uganda for commercial production. In both countries, the large plantations were devastated several times by easily-spread diseases and pests. The purple passion fruit (passiflora edulis) is the most commonly grown passion for commercial purpose in Kenya. It is mainly grown for fresh and juice extraction.
Passion fruit grows in warm to cool climates within altitude ranging from 1200-2000m. above sea level and minimum rainfall of 900mm per annum. The most suitable soil is medium texture (loamy), which are deep and well drained, with PH ranging from 5.5-7.5.

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