Peeling Off Your Money From Banana Farming

Simple Guide Smallscale farmers in Kenya can double the size of their banana bunches from 40 to 45kg – 80 to 100kgs by using health suckers from a clean, disease free orchard and inter-cropping with compatible crops such as beans. Kenya has over 500,000 small holder banana farmers with 1.5% of Kenya’s total arable land. Over 80% of most East Africans rely on banana for income and food with the global market for the crop totaling to some 5B dollars a year. Banana farming requires minimum effort but farmers should…

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Drip irrigation in fruits

Drip irrigation is a micro irrigation method in which the rate of water application is very low and without any pressure. i.e., drop by drop.  Drip irrigation is based on the basic concept of irrigation only the roots zone of crop, rather than the entire land surface on which the crop is grown. Water flows from the emission points through the soil by capillarity and gravity. The soil moisture content of the crop root zone is maintained at near optimum level to facilitate optimum crop growth and production. Drip irrigation…

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WHAT FARMERS SHOULD KNOW ABOUT TISSUE-CULTURE BANANAS

Thanks to increasing demand and enticing market costs, banana farming is gaining momentum. till recently, use of standard suckers as planting material has been the sole choice in banana farming. This methodology is most popular by several farmers. As a result, it needs less inputs and therefore the suckers are often planted forthwith within the field. However, the most plight with this sort of planting system is that the bananas simply suffer from pests and diseases like wilt disease, Sigatoka and microorganism Xanthomonas wilt (BXW). Banana weevils and nematodes also…

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WHY MODERN FARMERS ARE GROWING TISSUE-CULTURE BANANA IN KENYA

Oxfarm seedlings

Bananas are one of the most popular fruits on earth. In Kenya, the fruit is expansively cultivated for income generation and as a staple food by various local communities. However, the main predicament with banana farming in Kenya is that they are easily affected by diseases that reduce the yield and lead to sustenance and profit loss to the farmer. Diseases and pests that affect banana farming in Kenya include Fusarium Wilt and Sigatoka, weevils and nematodes, and bacterial infections such as bacterial Xanthomonas Wilt (BXW). Additionally, viruses such as…

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